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Abuse of Court System by Debt Buyers

Appleseed volunteers researched and wrote a white paper about the abuse of the judicial system by debt buyers.

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Abuse of Court System by Debt Buyers

Appleseed volunteers researched and wrote a white paper about the abuse of the judicial system by debt buyers. The white paper also included proposed solutions to the problem.

An article about the issue appeared in the February/March edition of the Louisiana Bar Journal. Volunteers also have appeared on radio shows to discuss this issue.

Click here for the article

Louisiana Appleseed, its volunteers and partners continue to work on this project.

Project Partners: Barrasso Usdin, Amy Duncan, Louisiana Civil Justice Center, Louisiana State Bar Association, and Southeast Louisiana Legal Services.

Earning CLE Credit for Pro Bono Representation

Effective May 1, 2015, every lawyer who does pro bono work can earn up to three hours of CLE credit each year, under an order signed by the Louisiana Supreme Court.

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Earning CLE Credit for Pro Bono Representation

Effective May 1, 2015, every lawyer who does pro bono work can earn up to three hours of CLE credit each year, under an order signed by the Louisiana Supreme Court. This Order followed a proposal by Louisiana Appleseed.  Volunteer attorneys from Adams and Reese LLP—Martin Stern, Jeff Richardson and Ron Sholes—worked together with retired Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Harry T. Lemmon, on this project for Louisiana Appleseed.

Under the new rule, attorneys who provide pro bono legal representation can earn one hour of CLE credit for every five hours of pro bono representation, up to a maximum of three hours of CLE credit per year.  The Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) Committee issued the forms needed to claim credit for “uncompensated pro bono legal representation to an indigent or near-indigent client or clients.” To be eligible for credit, “the matter must have been assigned by a court, a bar association, or a legal services or pro bono organization that has as its primary purpose the furnishing of such pro bono legal services.”

Entities wishing to qualify as a pro bono organization under the rule must complete the Application for Approval as a Qualifying Pro Bono Organization. In order to earn credit for pro bono representation, attorneys who perform pro bono legal work must complete the Application for CLE Credit for Pro Bono Representation.

Click below for the forms.

http://www.lascmcle.org/pdf/ProBonoCLE.pdf

http://www.lascmcle.org/pdf/ProBonoOrganization.pdf

Project Partners/Volunteers: Supreme Court Justice Harry T. Lemmon (ret.) and Adams and Reese.

Language Access in Louisiana Courts

Developing standards for courtroom interpreters is an essential step in ensuring equal access to the justice system, regardless of limited English proficiency.

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Language Access in Louisiana Courts

Developing standards for courtroom interpreters is an essential step in ensuring equal access to the justice system, regardless of limited English proficiency. Louisiana Appleseed volunteers from law firm Phelps Dunbar prepared an analysis of other states’ interpreter standards and drafted a model court rule for the Louisiana Supreme Court’s consideration, as well as a model Code of Professional Responsibility.

Louisiana Appleseed and the Language Access Coalition advocated for adoption of this rule, with the support of the Louisiana State Bar Association and the Louisiana Public Defender Board. The Louisiana Supreme Court ordered the adoption of a Code of Professional Responsibility for Language Interpreters, which became effective on September 1, 2012.

Click to view the Louisiana Supreme Court Order

Code of Professional Responsibility for Language Interpreters 

Louisiana Appleseed also advocated for the Louisiana Supreme Court joining the National Consortium for Language Access in Courts. In early 2012, the Louisiana Supreme Court became a member.

Louisiana Appleseed continues to advocate for state-wide interpreter standards to ensure equal access to the justice system, regardless of limited English proficiency. Louisiana Appleseed has been appointed to the Access to Justice Commission, serving on the Commission’s Language Access Subcommittee. The subcommittee is developing a plan for outreach and advocacy.

Project Partners: Phelps Dunbar, Carver Darden, Fowler Rodriguez, Louisiana Language Access Coalition, Louisiana State Bar Association, Hispanic Lawyers Association

Publication(s) Available

Disaster Training Manual

Immediately following the 2005 hurricanes, the Louisiana State Bar Association and its partners developed a manual for pro bono attorneys.

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Disaster Training Manual

Immediately following the 2005 hurricanes, the Louisiana State Bar Association and its partners developed a manual for pro bono attorneys. This Disaster Training Manual, which is made available to attorneys when disasters strike, enables attorneys to provide access to legal representation for thousands of Louisiana residents, especially the poor, who face legal challenges while recovering after a disaster. Louisiana Appleseed volunteers review and update the manual yearly to ensure that information is current, making the manual readily accessible for those who might need it.

Project Partners and Volunteers: Louisiana State Bar Association, Sher Garner, Andrew Capitelli, Milling Benson Woodward, LLP and Emma Mekinda

Volunteer Manual Download